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Shooting with Nikon's D5000 & D7000 cameras

A D5000 and Nikkor 18-70mm combo at the walden pond, MA.

A D5000 and Nikkor 18-70mm combo at the walden pond, MA.

The Nikon D5000 was a great beginner’s camera, if you know what you are doing then it has all the tools to provide you with the same quality images you can get with any $2000 or $3000 Nikon or Canon. There were a list of nagging absences that grated on me from the beginning and they were the reason why I chose to go ahead and get a d7000.

So here goes

  • The lack of a depth of field preview button. This proved entirely frustrating as I had couple of manual focus lenses and I had no way of knowing what was in focus when I chose to go higher than f4
  • No dedicated ISO button, this was a major problem as d5000 had really great ISO performance but in order to change ISO you had to g into the menu list and select them.
  • Bracketing and file type also needed menu diving and could not be changed without taking the eye off the viewfinder.
D7000 and Nikkor 18-70mm combo along with Cokin P filter system. I used 2 ND soft grads in a reverse ND formation for this shot.

D7000 and Nikkor 18-70mm combo along with Cokin P filter system. I used 2 ND soft grads in a reverse ND formation for this shot.

So when the D7000 came out I snatched one immediately, in fact the last one from the first batch Nikon sent to NH, I had to hunt through 3 Ritz camera shops to get one. I also acquired a dedicated wide angle lens around that time and my shots truly started to have some impact and shooting was a breeze. The ergonomics of the D7000 were spot on especially the new focus mode selector and I particularly enjoyed the dedicated button for various functions and user defined shooting modes. I still had couple of gripes about it but all in all it was a great camera for an enthusiast. Below are some of my nitpickings about the Nikon D7000.

  1. Back of the viewfinder is too close to the screen and you will be squishing your nose into the 3” display.
  2. ISO performance was not as big as a jump as I hoped from the 12mp sensor to the 16 mp one.
  3. I would have preferred a bit more wider grip as it gets tiring after a while when you are using a heavier lens.

As you can see I am seriously nitpicking here and the D7000 was truly a worthy successor to the legendary D90. FHFEMNVNXV62